Vila Wolf's Dyslexic Folklorist Ranting

Hmm... I've got a strange and bizarre mind. I know what you're saying, doesn't everyone on the internet? I can say this, I'm not for everyone. It was once said that I've got a razor wit, a dark sarcasm and one hell of a twisted sense of humor. I like horror, I am a folklorist and I smoke.

"Let me share something with you, a secret, We believe what we want to believe....the rest is all smoke and mirrors." - Arnaud de Fohn

Posts I've Liked


Ancient monuments mishandled by inferior restoration

archaeologicalnews:

image

While Turkish land is enriched by the historical sites of 206 ancient amphitheaters, most of which are left from Roman and Byzantine times, they are being mistreated by poor and haphazard restoration methods.

Turkey is fortunate to sit astride lands which were once part of the Roman and Byzantine empires. By virtue of this fact, the country has the world’s richest collection of ancient amphitheaters. According to some sources, there are 206 such ancient theaters in Turkey that are left from the Roman period. This figure is much greater than in any other country. However, the attention these precious monuments receive from the authorities is scant, while the recent restoration work carried out at these cultural sites shows obvious signs of the mistreatment to which they have been subject. Read more.

historicaltimes:


Photograph taken during a fire at the Smithsonian Castle which destroyed priceless collections of documents, books, and artwork, Washington, D.C., January 1865. The flames and smoke were painted in later. By Alexander Gardner. Read More

historicaltimes:

Photograph taken during a fire at the Smithsonian Castle which destroyed priceless collections of documents, books, and artwork, Washington, D.C., January 1865. The flames and smoke were painted in later. By Alexander Gardner.

Read More

mapsontheweb:

Mongol Empire, 1300 AD - 1405 AD

mapsontheweb:

Mongol Empire, 1300 AD - 1405 AD

(via historicaltimes)

mapsontheweb:

Map of the world 3000 BC to 2014 CE.
okmuht:

Each frame is every 100 years (I wanted to do it every 50, but the file was too large for GIF format). I created the GIF using this: http://geacron.com/home-en/

mapsontheweb:

Map of the world 3000 BC to 2014 CE.

okmuht:

Each frame is every 100 years (I wanted to do it every 50, but the file was too large for GIF format). I created the GIF using this: http://geacron.com/home-en/

(via historicaltimes)

thisismyplacetobe:

A ‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse is a rare phenomenon that occurs when the moon’s orbit is at its apogee: the part of its orbit farthest away from the Earth. Because the moon is so far away, it seems smaller than normal to the human eye. The result is that the moon doesn’t entirely block out our view of the sun, but leaves an “annulus,” or ring of sunlight glowing around it. Hence the term  “annular” eclipse rather than a “total” eclipse.

(via smiletotheshadow)

ancientpeoples:

Censer, Seated King
4th Century AD
Maya Culture
Guatemala
Perhaps the depiction of a fourth-century Maya king, this incense burner would have been used to make offerings carried by smoke to the spirits and deities in the supernatural realm. Rulers are represented in Maya art as communicators with the supernatural and the living may have sought their continued intervention after death. The use of censers bearing the royal image may have reinforced the belief that when a ruler died he became divine. This censer is composed of two parts, the base in which the incense burned and the chimney decorated with the image of the Maya lord. This bearded figure, whose body is rather schematic in presentation, perhaps suggesting an early date, sits cross-legged wearing a richly ornamented headdress and large earspools, and holding before him what may be a royal emblem.
(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Censer, Seated King

4th Century AD

Maya Culture

Guatemala

Perhaps the depiction of a fourth-century Maya king, this incense burner would have been used to make offerings carried by smoke to the spirits and deities in the supernatural realm. Rulers are represented in Maya art as communicators with the supernatural and the living may have sought their continued intervention after death. The use of censers bearing the royal image may have reinforced the belief that when a ruler died he became divine. This censer is composed of two parts, the base in which the incense burned and the chimney decorated with the image of the Maya lord. This bearded figure, whose body is rather schematic in presentation, perhaps suggesting an early date, sits cross-legged wearing a richly ornamented headdress and large earspools, and holding before him what may be a royal emblem.

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

Open Access Archaeology Digest #514

openaccessarchaeology:

Open Access (free to read) Archaeology articles for anyone and everyone:

Ardoch - Account of the Excavations and Descriptions of Plans, &c.
http://bit.ly/14DKnSU

Anglo-Saxon Document relating to Lands at Send and Sunbury, in Middlesex, in the time of Eadgar: and the Writ of Cnut, on the accession of Archbishop Aethelnoth to the See of Canterbury; A.D. 1020
http://bit.ly/16HFRBf

Long cists at Addinston, Berwickshire
http://bit.ly/Y1n9Sx

Learn more about Open Access and Archaeology at: http://bit.ly/YHuyFK

peashooter85:

Rare and unusual 30 shot revolver, most likely of French or Belgian origin, mid to late 19th century.

(Source: rockislandauction.com)

Stuff You Missed in History Class - The Great Locomotive Chase, Part 1

missedinhistory:

Another installment from our listener-submitted suggestions for happier history subjects: Today’s episode is about the Great Locomotive Chase, also known as Andrews’ Raid. This is the story of a Northern raid deep into Southern territory during the American Civil War. The objective: Steal a train outside Atlanta, drive it north, and destroy the tracks along the way, cutting Atlanta off from the rest of the Confederacy and seriously hampering the South’s war effort. The chase itself is a lot of fun, even though its aftermath takes a more serious turn.

This episode is two parts. The first takes us up to the actual theft of the train, and the second takes us all the way through some very dramatic prison escapes to where these train engines are today.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

fashionsfromhistory:

Phrygian Cap
Late 18th Century 
France
Royal Museums Greenwich

fashionsfromhistory:

Phrygian Cap

Late 18th Century 

France

Royal Museums Greenwich

(via 18thcenturylove)