Vila Wolf's Dyslexic Folklorist Ranting

Hmm... I've got a strange and bizarre mind. I know what you're saying, doesn't everyone on the internet? I can say this, I'm not for everyone. It was once said that I've got a razor wit, a dark sarcasm and one hell of a twisted sense of humor. I like horror, I am a folklorist and I smoke.

"Let me share something with you, a secret, We believe what we want to believe....the rest is all smoke and mirrors." - Arnaud de Fohn

Posts I've Liked


peashooter85:

It is a very common tale of immigration to America, a family arrives at Ellis from a far off land, with little command of the language, and the inspectors “Americanize” the their identity from whatever exotic surname they brought with them to something easier on American ears.
We’re all heard the story, and many people no doubt have it as part of their personal family history. Except is is almost all a load of baloney! Historians of the period have poured over countless records, and found next to nothing that indicates such changes were actually pressed upon the new arrivals. In fact, they didn’t write anything down, but rather just confirmed the name off of the passenger manifests.
What researchers take from this is that any changes made to the names of immigrants stemmed either from earlier or later. In some case it might have been a mistake on the part of the ticket counter in Europe, with the name written down wrong on the manifest and never corrected upon arrival, but the vast majority of changes came from the immigrants themselves, who, hoping to assimilate into their new homeland, changed the name out of their own volition. Despite the well entrenched myth, there is nothing to suggest any sort of policy forcing it upon arrivals.
Well, almost a myth. There is evidence for at least one “name change” happening at Ellis Island. Records show that Frank Woodhull, who upon arrival was found to be a woman traveling in men’s clothing, was properly amended in the manifest and  recorded as Mary Johnson.
(For further reading, story sourced from the NYPL, Photo from Library of Congress, Submitted by G.K. Zhukov)

peashooter85:

It is a very common tale of immigration to America, a family arrives at Ellis from a far off land, with little command of the language, and the inspectors “Americanize” the their identity from whatever exotic surname they brought with them to something easier on American ears.

We’re all heard the story, and many people no doubt have it as part of their personal family history. Except is is almost all a load of baloney! Historians of the period have poured over countless records, and found next to nothing that indicates such changes were actually pressed upon the new arrivals. In fact, they didn’t write anything down, but rather just confirmed the name off of the passenger manifests.

What researchers take from this is that any changes made to the names of immigrants stemmed either from earlier or later. In some case it might have been a mistake on the part of the ticket counter in Europe, with the name written down wrong on the manifest and never corrected upon arrival, but the vast majority of changes came from the immigrants themselves, who, hoping to assimilate into their new homeland, changed the name out of their own volition. Despite the well entrenched myth, there is nothing to suggest any sort of policy forcing it upon arrivals.

Well, almost a myth. There is evidence for at least one “name change” happening at Ellis Island. Records show that Frank Woodhull, who upon arrival was found to be a woman traveling in men’s clothing, was properly amended in the manifest and  recorded as Mary Johnson.

(For further reading, story sourced from the NYPL, Photo from Library of Congress, Submitted by G.K. Zhukov)

archaeoblogs:

A  Special Day OutSource: http://bit.ly/PnkTn4
During the winter months there isn’t much to do here in Crete as most  Museums and  tourist shops are closed. Now spring is here everything comes to life and tourists begin to arrive. So John and I decided to go to the Archaeological Museum of Siteia where there is a renewed Exhibition. We were especially interested as John and I had helped with conservation of some of the vessels displayed in the museum, while at the Institute for Aegean Prehistory Study Center for East Crete.
The Archaeological Museum of Siteia, like all the local museums of Greece constructed………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

archaeoblogs:

A Special Day Out
Source: http://bit.ly/PnkTn4

During the winter months there isn’t much to do here in Crete as most  Museums and  tourist shops are closed. Now spring is here everything comes to life and tourists begin to arrive. So John and I decided to go to the Archaeological Museum of Siteia where there is a renewed Exhibition. We were especially interested as John and I had helped with conservation of some of the vessels displayed in the museum, while at the Institute for Aegean Prehistory Study Center for East Crete. The Archaeological Museum of Siteia, like all the local museums of Greece constructed………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

widenerlibrary:

New Acquisition
Pue’s Occurrences Irish Newspaper reporting the surrender of Montreal during the French Indian War on September 8th, 1760. Published in Dublin.
Many thanks to Lidia Uziel, Librarian for Western Europe, for showing us this 250-year-old piece of news!

widenerlibrary:

New Acquisition

Pue’s Occurrences Irish Newspaper reporting the surrender of Montreal during the French Indian War on September 8th, 1760. Published in Dublin.

Many thanks to Lidia Uziel, Librarian for Western Europe, for showing us this 250-year-old piece of news!

ancientpeoples:

Golden solidus of Valentinian 
2cm in diameter (13 / 16 inch.) 
Byzantine Period, 365 - 374 AD. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Golden solidus of Valentinian 

2cm in diameter (13 / 16 inch.) 

Byzantine Period, 365 - 374 AD. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

unhistorical:

Detail of the celestial globe from The Ambassadors (1533), Hans Holbein the Younger

(via ronchronchronch)

joshbyard:

Google X Lab Files Patent for Contact Lens With Built-In Camera

Google has invented a new smart contact lens with an integrated camera. The camera would be very small and sit near the edge of the contact lens so that it doesn’t obscure your vision. By virtue of being part of the contact lens, the camera would naturally follow your gaze, allowing for a huge range of awesome applications, from the basis of a bionic eye system for blind and visually impaired people, through to early warning systems (the camera spots a hazard before your brain does), facial recognition, and superhuman powers (telescopic and infrared/night vision). 

(via Google invents smart contact lens with built-in camera: Superhuman Terminator-like vision here we come | ExtremeTech)

joshbyard:

Google X Lab Files Patent for Contact Lens With Built-In Camera

Google has invented a new smart contact lens with an integrated camera. The camera would be very small and sit near the edge of the contact lens so that it doesn’t obscure your vision. By virtue of being part of the contact lens, the camera would naturally follow your gaze, allowing for a huge range of awesome applications, from the basis of a bionic eye system for blind and visually impaired people, through to early warning systems (the camera spots a hazard before your brain does), facial recognition, and superhuman powers (telescopic and infrared/night vision). 

(via Google invents smart contact lens with built-in camera: Superhuman Terminator-like vision here we come | ExtremeTech)

(via we-are-star-stuff)

lostsplendor:

Eight Street, Philadelphia ca. 19th Century via Library Company of Philadelphia - Flickr Commons

lostsplendor:

Eight Street, Philadelphia ca. 19th Century via Library Company of Philadelphia - Flickr Commons

thegetty:

Winter is coming. All men must die. And Game of Thrones is back!
Stay tuned each week as we unpack Sunday’s episodes through artworks.

A lot happened in this episode for most of the major characters involved, but then again, nothing earth-shattering happened.

We saw a witness to a murder flee the scene of the crime in a boat concealed by a fog bank; we got a lesson in kingship (N.B. wisdom is the greatest strength); a burial scene got steamy with, um, incestuous sex; two lovers fled an awkwardly male-dominated residence for an ironically female-dominated one; we watched a little girl give an old man a reading lesson; a pair of travelers took advantage of a feeble old man; there was a fierce massacre (and some cannibalism) and a bisexual brothel trist; a prison cell conversation turned emo real fast (*feels*); and the sphinxes of a foreign city may prove no match for the might of a slave-freeing, dragon rearing queen, especially when her unmounted knight bests the enemy’s horse-bound champion.

historicaltimes:


Spanish influenza ward at Camp Funston, Kansas, 1918 Source: otisarchives4 (flickr)Read More

historicaltimes:

Spanish influenza ward at Camp Funston, Kansas, 1918

Source: otisarchives4 (flickr)

Read More

Community dig sheds new light on Wark Castle in Northumberland

archaeologicalnews:

image

A community dig has shed new light on a castle which for centuries was in the front line of the conflict between England and Scotland.

It has shown that Wark Castle on the Northumberland side of the River Tweed was more of a heavyweight prospect than previously believed.

The excavations are the latest in a series by the Flodden 500 Archaeological project.

The venture began in 2009 with a grant from English Heritage in the run-up to last year’s marking of the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden.

It has led to the setting up of the Till Valley Archaeology Group, which now has more than 100 members. Read more.