Vila Wolf's Dyslexic Folklorist Ranting

Hmm... I've got a strange and bizarre mind. I know what you're saying, doesn't everyone on the internet? I can say this, I'm not for everyone. It was once said that I've got a razor wit, a dark sarcasm and one hell of a twisted sense of humor. I like horror, I am a folklorist and I smoke.

"Let me share something with you, a secret, We believe what we want to believe....the rest is all smoke and mirrors." - Arnaud de Fohn

Posts I've Liked


houghtonlib:

Nicolay, Nicolas de, 1517-1583. Le navigationi et viaggi nella Turchia, 1577.

Typ 530.77.606

Houghton Library, Harvard University

artofthedarkages:

Gospels, MS 58, Trinity College Dublin

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - July 28, 1915 - Beginning of a 19 years U.S. Marine Occupation of Haiti. 
Following the bloody assassination of Haitian President Vilbrun Guillaume Sam by an angry mob in Port-Au-Prince (in response to the equally bloody slaying of political prisoners days before), the United States felt it had no choice but to occupy the country to put an end to the violence and anarchy that had characterize Haitian politics since the late 19th century. 
While these were certainly part of Washington’s overall considerations, most historians have pointed out that, from the beginning of the 1900s onwards, the United States attempted to pressure different Haitian governments into accepting a “peaceful” intervention in the country. In the 1910s, the United States battled with French interests for the control of the Banque Nationale d’Haiti. A few years before, it also took control of the neighbouring Dominican Republic customs, thus becoming arbitrator of the country’s economy (and occupying it officially as of 1916). More importantly however, there were many (misguided) accounts that Haiti was on the verge of being controlled by German merchants who were a small but powerful community in the island. 
By 1915, one more incident was needed for the United States to enter Haiti and give its intervention the appearance of respecting international law. This “opportunity” came on the 28th of July and Marine forces occupied Haiti for the next 19 years.  
Image: Courtesy of Corbis Images. //// Source and Further Reading: X and X 

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - July 28, 1915 - Beginning of a 19 years U.S. Marine Occupation of Haiti. 

Following the bloody assassination of Haitian President Vilbrun Guillaume Sam by an angry mob in Port-Au-Prince (in response to the equally bloody slaying of political prisoners days before), the United States felt it had no choice but to occupy the country to put an end to the violence and anarchy that had characterize Haitian politics since the late 19th century. 

While these were certainly part of Washington’s overall considerations, most historians have pointed out that, from the beginning of the 1900s onwards, the United States attempted to pressure different Haitian governments into accepting a “peaceful” intervention in the country. In the 1910s, the United States battled with French interests for the control of the Banque Nationale d’Haiti. A few years before, it also took control of the neighbouring Dominican Republic customs, thus becoming arbitrator of the country’s economy (and occupying it officially as of 1916). More importantly however, there were many (misguided) accounts that Haiti was on the verge of being controlled by German merchants who were a small but powerful community in the island. 

By 1915, one more incident was needed for the United States to enter Haiti and give its intervention the appearance of respecting international law. This “opportunity” came on the 28th of July and Marine forces occupied Haiti for the next 19 years.  

Image: Courtesy of Corbis Images. //// Source and Further Reading: X and X 

twostriptechnicolor:

Times Square neon at night, 1937 and 1939.

(I’m pretty sure the ‘37 shot from Nothing Sacred is a composite shot. And I just love the effect on the peanuts in the Planters sign.)

(via 1901-a-space-odyssey)

oldbookillustrations:

Singoalla.

Carl Larsson, from Singoalla, by  Viktor Rydberg, Stockholm, 1894.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Singoalla.

Carl Larsson, from Singoalla, by Viktor Rydberg, Stockholm, 1894.

(Source: archive.org)

peashooter85:

An ornate silver mounted double barrel flintlock rifle signed Charles Simon.  Charles Simon was the master gunsmith for King Louis XVI from 1765 to 1796.

(Source: invaluable.com)

tartanandtweed:

(by elinor04)
legrandcirque:

St Lawrence Gate Drogheda with numerous jaunting cars transporting members of the Photographic Convention of the United Kingdom on a tour around Dublin, Ireland, July 1894.

legrandcirque:

St Lawrence Gate Drogheda with numerous jaunting cars transporting members of the Photographic Convention of the United Kingdom on a tour around Dublin, Ireland, July 1894.

(via 1901-a-space-odyssey)

archaicwonder:

Greek Silver Stater from Karystos, Euboea c. 300-250 BC
The coin shows a cow standing right, her head turned back tenderly to her calf. On the reverse, proud cockrel standing right; KAΡΥΣΤΙΩΝ to left. A wonderful example of Greek reverence for the domestic animals they depended upon.
Karystos was an ancient city-state on the island of Euboea. In the Iliad, Homer says that it is controlled by the Abantes, an ancient Ionian tribe. Karystos is also mentioned in the Linear B tablets as “ka-ru-to.”

archaicwonder:

Greek Silver Stater from Karystos, Euboea c. 300-250 BC

The coin shows a cow standing right, her head turned back tenderly to her calf. On the reverse, proud cockrel standing right; KAΡΥΣΤΙΩΝ to left. A wonderful example of Greek reverence for the domestic animals they depended upon.

Karystos was an ancient city-state on the island of Euboea. In the Iliad, Homer says that it is controlled by the Abantes, an ancient Ionian tribe. Karystos is also mentioned in the Linear B tablets as “ka-ru-to.”

historicaltimes:

A Japanese American unfurled this banner the day after the Pearl Harbor attack.

Oh man… He knew what was coming…

historicaltimes:

A Japanese American unfurled this banner the day after the Pearl Harbor attack.

Oh man… He knew what was coming…