Vila Wolf's Dyslexic Folklorist Ranting

Hmm... I've got a strange and bizarre mind. I know what you're saying, doesn't everyone on the internet? I can say this, I'm not for everyone. It was once said that I've got a razor wit, a dark sarcasm and one hell of a twisted sense of humor. I like horror, I am a folklorist and I smoke.

"Let me share something with you, a secret, We believe what we want to believe....the rest is all smoke and mirrors." - Arnaud de Fohn

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art-of-swords:

Rapier Sword

  • Dated: early 17th century
  • Culture: German
  • Measurements: overall length 123 cm

The sword has a long, straight, double-edged blade, with a central fuller with a slightly visible inscription at the forte. It features a fine, iron hilt with lower side ring, two shell-shaped valves and another valve at the front pierced with a flower. The “S”-shaped quillon has two-loop guard, creating a cage at the rear part. The massive, oval pommel has a large closing button, wooden grip with iron wire binding and a moor’s heads.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

artofthedarkages:

3r, Gospels, Cotton MS Nero D IV, British Library

biomedicalephemera:

Our Three (Brain) Mothers

Protecting our brain and central nervous system are the meninges, derived from the Greek term for “membrane”. You may have heard of meningitis - this is when the innermost layer of the meninges swells, often due to infection, and can cause nerve or brain damage, and sometimes death.

There are three meningeal layers: the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater. In Latin, “mater” means “mother”. The term comes from the enveloping nature of these membranes, but we later learned how apt it was, because of how protective and essential the meningeal layers are.

——————————————————-

  • The dura mater is the outermost and toughest membrane. Its name means “tough mother”.

The dura is most important for keeping cerebrospinal fluid where it belongs, and for allowing the safe transport of blood to and from the brain. This layer is also water-tight - if it weren’t, our cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) would leak out, and our central nervous system would have no cushion! Its leathery qualities mean that even when the skull is broken, more often than not, the dura (and the brain it encases) is not punctured.

  • The arachnoid mater is the middle membrane. Its name means "spider-like mother", because of its web-like nature.

The arachnoid is attached directly to the deep side of the dura, and has small protrusions into the sinuses within the dura, which allows for CSF to return to the bloodstream and not become stagnant. It also has very fine, web-like projections downward, which attach to the pia mater. However, it doesn’t contact the pia mater in the same way as the dura: the CSF flows between the two meningeal layers, in the subarachnoid space. The major superficial blood vessels are on top of the arachnoid, and below the dura.

  • Pia mater is the innermost membrane, which follows the folds (sulci) of the brain and spinal cord most closely. Its name means “tender mother”.

The pia is what makes sure the CSF stays between the meninges, and doesn’t just get absorbed into the brain or spinal cord. It also allows for new CSF from the ventricles to be shunted into the subarachnoid space, and provides pathways for blood vessels to nourish the brain. While the pia mater is very thin, it is water-tight, just like the dura mater. The pia is also the primary blood-brain barrier, making sure that no plasma proteins or organic molecules penetrate into the CSF. 

Because of this barrier, medications which need to reach the brain or meninges must be administered directly into the CSF.

Images:
Anatomy: Practical and Surgical. Henry Gray, 1909.

ancientart:

A brief look at the prehistoric rock art of Laas Geel, Somaliland (East Africa).

Despite already being known to the local inhabitants of the area for centuries, the art was ‘discovered’ by a team of French archaeologists carrying out an archaeological survey in northern Somalia in 2002, thus only recently gaining international recognition. 

Laas Geel is one of the most remarkable archaeological sites in the Horn of Africa, and contains some of the earliest known cave paintings in the region. These paintings are estimated to date to between 9,000-3,000 BCE, and are incredibly preserved considering this.

The artworks, painted in the distinctive Ethiopian-Arabian style, depict predominantly wild animals, decorated cows, and herders, the latter believed to have been the creators of the paintings. Note the herd of cows shown in the first photo, the ceremonial cow shown in the seventh, and the herder shown aside the cow in the final photograph. 

Photos taken by joepyrek.

Recommended reading: Grenier L., P. Antoniotti, G. Hamon, and D. Happe. “Laas Geel (Somaliland): 5000 year-old paintings captured in 3D.” International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences, Volume XL-5/W2 (2013): 283-288.

archaicwonder:

Greco-Thracian Bow Fibula with Herakles Knots, 4th Century BC












This large gold fibula is composed of an arcing bow with a spiral spring and long, straight pin inserted at one of its terminals. The pin rests in the lower edge of a large catchplate that is attached to the other end of the bow by means of another coil of gold. The bow and catchplate are decorated with finely detailed filigree goldwork. A magnificent decorative ensemble of a rosette framed by a Herakles knot is placed in the center of the bow. Lavish and graceful palmettes frame the knot and give the piece an expansive quality. Two caps with rows of scale or feather patterns and turned ends finish the bow. The decoration of the rectangular catchplate is equally opulent. The rosette and knot motif repeats and is framed by a beaded edge and braided frame. The catchplate’s curving contour echoes the shape of the bow and lessens the severity of the fibula.

archaicwonder:

Greco-Thracian Bow Fibula with Herakles Knots, 4th Century BC

This large gold fibula is composed of an arcing bow with a spiral spring and long, straight pin inserted at one of its terminals. The pin rests in the lower edge of a large catchplate that is attached to the other end of the bow by means of another coil of gold. The bow and catchplate are decorated with finely detailed filigree goldwork. A magnificent decorative ensemble of a rosette framed by a Herakles knot is placed in the center of the bow. Lavish and graceful palmettes frame the knot and give the piece an expansive quality. Two caps with rows of scale or feather patterns and turned ends finish the bow. The decoration of the rectangular catchplate is equally opulent. The rosette and knot motif repeats and is framed by a beaded edge and braided frame. The catchplate’s curving contour echoes the shape of the bow and lessens the severity of the fibula.

When about to undergo a water-cure in Finland the patient may recite:

O pure water! water’s Mistress!

Water’s Mistress ! water’s Master!

Make me now both well and healthy,

Beautiful as formerly,

Since I pray in chosen language.

Since I give thee as an offering

Blood in order to appease thee,

Salt as well to reconcile thee.

—   Excerpt From: Folklore Society (Great Britain). “Finnish Folklore.” [London, Folklore Society], 1890.

(Source: charlottesarahscrivener)

oldbookillustrations:

Camellia Archiduchesse Augusta.

From Flore des Serres et des Jardins de l’Europe (Flowers of the Greenhouses and Gardens of Europe) vol. 5, by Charles Lemaire, Michael Scheidweiler, and Louis van Houtte, Ghent, 1848.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Camellia Archiduchesse Augusta.

From Flore des Serres et des Jardins de l’Europe (Flowers of the Greenhouses and Gardens of Europe) vol. 5, by Charles Lemaire, Michael Scheidweiler, and Louis van Houtte, Ghent, 1848.

(Source: archive.org)

ancientfaces:

Moving the Family Hen House
Gather a team of horses for your next move! Four horses moving the Diersch family hen house in Canada, 1915. [ Original: Diersch family history Canada 1915 ]

ancientfaces:

Moving the Family Hen House

Gather a team of horses for your next move! Four horses moving the Diersch family hen house in Canada, 1915. [ Original: Diersch family history Canada 1915 ]

erikkwakkel:

Smart page with string

These pages from a late-16th-century scientific manuscript share a most unusual feature: they contain a string that runs through a pierced hole. Dozens of them are found in this book. The pages contain diagrams that accompany astronomical tracts. They show such things as the working of the astrolabe (Pic 1), the position of the stars (Pic 4), and the movement of the sun (Pic 6). The book was written and copied by the cartographer Jean du Temps of Blois (born 1555), about whom little appears to be known. The book contains a number of volvelles or wheel charts: revolving disks that the reader would turn to execute calculations. The strings seen in these images are another example of the “hands-on” kind of reading the book facilitates. Pulling the string tight and moving it from left to right, or all the way around, would connect different bits of data, like a modern computer: the string drew a temporary line between two or more values, highlighting their relationship. The tiny addition made the physical page as smart as its contents.

Pics: London, British Library, Harley MS 3263: more on this book here; and full digital reproduction here.

(via uispeccoll)

magictransistor:

Andreas Cellarius, Atlas Coelestis seu Harmonia Macrocosmica (Celestial Charts), 1660 - 1708.

(via 18thcenturylove)